Select Page

Hiking is a great way to get outdoors and enjoy nature, but it’s important to make sure you have the right fuel to keep you going. One food that is often considered for hiking is yogurt, but it’s not always the best choice. While yogurt can be a good source of protein and probiotics, it also has some potential drawbacks that hikers should be aware of.

In this article, we’ll take a closer look at some of the reasons why yogurt may not be the best food option for hikers, including its weight and bulk, lack of calorie density, tendency to spoil, and difficulty eating on the go. We’ll also explore some alternative food options that hikers may want to consider.

1. Heavy And Bulky

Yogurt can be heavy and bulky to carry, taking up valuable space in a hiking pack. This can be an issue for hikers who are trying to minimize the weight and volume of their gear, as every ounce counts when you’re on the trail.

2. May Not Be As Calorie Dense As Other Hiking Foods

It may not be as calorie-dense as other hiking foods, meaning hikers may need to bring more to meet their energy needs. Some hikers require a high-calorie intake to fuel their activity and may find that they need to eat more yogurt than they would other types of food to meet their energy needs.

3. Perishable

Yogurt can spoil quickly in warm temperatures, so hikers may need to pack a cooler to keep it fresh. This can be an additional piece of gear that hikers need to carry and can be a hassle to manage.

4. Lactose Intolerant Hikers

Some hikers may be lactose intolerant and unable to consume yogurt. For these hikers, yogurt would not be a viable option for hiking food.

5. Waste

The packaging of yogurt can create waste that hikers need to carry out or dispose of properly. For hikers who are trying to minimize their impact on the environment, the packaging of yogurt can be an issue.

6. Not All Of Us Love the Texture

The texture of some yogurts can be thick and difficult to consume while on the move. This can be an issue for hikers who are trying to eat on the go and may find that the texture of yogurt makes it difficult to consume while hiking.

7. Sugar Content

Some yogurts are high in sugar which could be not suitable for hikers who are looking for low-sugar options. Hikers may prefer to eat food with lower sugar content to maintain stable energy levels during their hike.

Related: How Do You Acclimatize For A 14er?

8. Alternative Protein Sources

Some hikers may prefer other types of protein sources, such as nuts or jerky. While yogurt is a good source of protein, some hikers may prefer other options that they find more palatable or convenient.

9. Not The Most Practical Food Source

Yogurt may not be as easy to eat on the go as other hiking foods, such as energy bars or trail mix. For hikers who are trying to eat while on the move, yogurt may not be the most convenient option.

10. Creates Discomfort In Some

Some hikers may find that yogurt does not sit well in their stomachs while hiking. This can be an issue for hikers who are trying to maintain their energy levels during their hike and may need to avoid yogurt as a food option.

11. Not The Most Versatile

Yogurt may not be as versatile as other hiking foods, as it is typically consumed as is and not used in cooking. This can be an issue for hikers who are looking for a more varied diet while on the trail.

12. Are You Vegan?

Yogurt may not be a good option for hikers who are vegan or following a plant-based diet. As yogurt is made from dairy, it would not be a viable food option for these hikers.

13. Nutrition

Some hikers may find that yogurt does not provide enough variety in their diet while on the trail. Hikers may prefer to eat a variety of different foods to maintain their energy levels and avoid getting bored with their food options.

14. Conveniency Can Also Be An Issue

Yogurt may not be as convenient for hikers who are on a multi-day trip and need to plan for food storage and preparation. This could be an issue for hikers who are on a long hike and need to plan for food that is easy to store and prepare.

15. Will You Be Going For A Long Hike?

Some hikers may find that yogurt does not provide the sustained energy they need for long hikes. Some hikers may find that yogurt does not provide the sustained energy that they need for longer hikes and may prefer other types of food to help them maintain their energy levels.

Related: How Tall Are Sherpas? And Answers To Related FAQs

5 Additional Reasons Why Yoghurt Is Not Good For Hiking

Here are five additional potential drawbacks to consider when it comes to using yogurt as a hiking food:

  • Yogurt requires a spoon or utensil to eat, which can be difficult to manage while hiking.
  • Yogurt may not be suitable for hikers who are looking for gluten-free options.
  • Some hikers may not like the taste of yogurt, which can make it unappealing as a hiking food.
  • Yogurt can be messy to eat, which can be an issue for hikers who are trying to keep their gear clean.
  • Some hikers may prefer to eat food that can be rehydrated or cooked, and yogurt doesn’t have that option.

Please note that all these are just potential drawbacks and some hikers may not find them to be issues. It’s ultimately up to the individual hiker to determine whether or not yogurt is a suitable food option for them on the trail.

Also worth noting, yogurt can be a great source of protein and probiotics, which can be beneficial for maintaining a healthy gut. It’s also low in fat and high in calcium, which can be beneficial.

Alternative Foods For Hiking

There are many alternative food options for hikers to consider. Some popular options include:

Trail mix

A combination of nuts, seeds, dried fruit, and chocolate or other sweets, trail mix is a convenient and calorie-dense option for hikers. It’s easy to pack and eat on the go, and it can provide a good balance of protein, carbohydrates, and healthy fats.

Jerky

A great source of protein, jerky is a lightweight and easy-to-pack option. It is also easy to eat while on the move, and it will last longer than fresh meat.

Energy bars

Energy bars are a convenient and calorie-dense option for hikers. They are easy to pack and eat on the go, and they come in a variety of flavors and types, such as protein bars, energy bars, and meal replacement bars.

Fresh fruit

Fresh fruit such as apples, oranges, and bananas can be a good source of natural sugars, electrolytes, and vitamins, but they can be heavy to carry and may not last long on a multi-day hike.

Dried fruit

Dried fruit is lightweight and easy to pack, and it can provide a good source of natural sugars and vitamins.

Nuts and seeds

Nuts and seeds are a great source of protein, healthy fats, and calories, and they are easy to pack and eat on the go.

Tuna or chicken in pouches

These are lightweight and easy to pack, and they can provide a good source of protein.

Dehydrated meals

These are lightweight, easy to pack, and easy to prepare, and they can provide a variety of options in terms of taste and nutritional value.

It’s important to note that these are just a few examples of alternative food options, and hikers should choose what works best for them and their dietary needs.